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Daily Express (front page), dated Saturday 30th November 1957, price 2 d(old pennies). Headline: "Riddle of the night sky" "what was it that stripped the paint off this trawler?" "The 'thing' blows up at sea, Express staff reporters." "The mystery of a huge flaming object, flashing at lightning speed across the night sky and vanishing in a mighty explosion was still unsolved last night. To those who saw the 'thing', in a Fleetwood trawler, it was was a frightening, wonderfull, never to be forgotten experience. Some people described it as 'carrot-shaped', others like a 'massive flying wing', but no-one could say what it was. The time was 02:35 AM. A fleetwood trawler, 'Ella Hewett' was sailing between the Isle of Man and Scotland, on her way to Iceland. The four men on watch saw a deep red glow, which lingered in the sky for three minutes, then as dawn came, Skipper Fred Sutton looked at the wheel house and bridge, which was white the night before. Not a speck of white paint was to be seen, only the red-lead undercoating. Skipper Sutton radioed the owners and said "A very funny thing has happened". He told them about the vanishing paint. Said a spokesman for the owners, the Hewett Fishing company last night, "The Skipper was naturally mystified and said 'I have been scratching my head about it, now you scratch yours!". As the Ella Hewett steamed off Oban, Skipper Sutton said over the radio telephone "It's no seaman's tale, I'm telling you about, laddie, it happened all right, even though I did not actually see it myself." Then 45 year-old Bosun, Hugh Smith, spoke about the cloud. "I have seen some strange things in my time at sea, but nothing like this. One moment it was dark, then the next, there was this eerie something all about us. There was no vibration, no explosion, in fact, no sensation at all. but it was something strange to see, I can tell you!". Two Coastguards, out of half a dozen people who saw the 'thing' on the Isle of Man told their stories last night, and one was asked by the headquarters of the British Coastguard service in London to send a full report. The time was 02:35 AM. 30 year-old Coastguard James Harvey, from Belfast, sent recently for duty to the Isle of Man was just going off- duty at Scarlet Point, 9 miles from Douglas, and within mile of the Ronaldsway airport. As he got on a cycle to go 1 miles to his home, he looked up. "I saw something travelling fast from West to East", he said. "It was larger and brighter than any star. It was blue, white, and" [go to page 2, column 4] "coming behind was a red-orange glow. The speed was terrific, I thought at first it was a Jet, but no Jet plane could travel at that speed. I would say 3 seconds later, there was a bang. Whatever it was went into the cloud, or rather, the mist above the sea. It's course was astonishlingly steady, and straight. It was miles up, and it certainly was not a flying star. I have seen those, and I have seen meteors too, this was nothing like them". Coastguard Harvey tried hard to describe the 'thing'. "It was snub- nosed and tapered off, just like a carrot" he said. "It was rather frightening". Coastguard Joseph Prophet, aged 42, just caught a glimpse of the flames, but heard the explosion. He said "It cut across the sky like sheet lightning, there was that yellowish glow, and then the flash lit up the whole area and the sea as well". On the promenade at Douglas, 10 miles away from the Coastguard station, Frank Quayle, 50 year old painter was making his way home to Meerhall private hotel when he saw it. He works at night, keeping fresh the pedestrian crossings and the white lines for traffic in the town. He was just 50 yards from his front door, facing Douglas bay, when he heard something. "I don't know what it was", he said, "and I don't know what it meant, but I have the feeling I had a grandstand view of the grand finale of something historic. I saw the 'thing' come in over the top of the town, going straight and fast seawards. A sheet of orange flame seemed to leave it. The front was bluish-white, I could just not think at all, then I lost it in the mist over Douglas bay. There was a real 'boom' of an explosion, the kind of explosion that I have never heard before. It was just like something breaking up and melting away, the sight was wonderfull". Three policemen on the beat in different parts of Douglas saw the flash and heard the explosion. Police headquarters last night said "we had nundreds of enquiries, but no official report, and we are making no official enquiries". Down in South Wales, people were still talking of the 'thing', like a massive flying wing which whisked along in the sky. Time-2:25 AM. Two policemen in different parts of the Rhonda valley looked into the cloudless night and saw the 'thing' shooting along straight and silent. They immediately reported a very bright blue object with a long bright tail travelling north-west. 2:28 AM-on the lonely Brecon Beacons, the driver of a 15-ton lorry saw the 'thing' through his windscreen. "A big red ball of fire, very low, silent, and travelling very fast", he told police over the telephone. "It was at least 3 times as big as my lorry". 2:35 AM-The crew of a police patrol car near Cowerbridge, Glamorgan, 20 miles away, said they saw the 'thing' only 100 feet from the ground. "It was illuminated, Delta-shaped, and bright greenish-blue in colour". Was it a Sputnik or it's rocket? Prof. Bernard Lovell, in charge of Manchester University's giant radio telescope at Jodrell Bank said last night "It is most unlikely. I think it was a large meteorite", but he added, " We are extremely uncertain about the position of rocket I. We cannot exclude the possibility that it has already come in". At that time, the first rocket and sattelite I were in the southern hemisphere, and sattelite II was 1,000 miles North of Jodrell Bank, and 700 miles up. Was it a British rocket being tested? The supply ministry rocket chiefs claimed that the 'thing' could not possibly have been one of their experimental rockets, or rocket-assisted aircraft. Was it a meteorite? A meteorlogical office spokesman said that there had been no reports of a meteorite. Was it a plane? The Air ministry said no aircraft was missing. Note to the mystery: Coastguards at Ramsay in the Isle of Man heard and saw nothing, yet the explosion wakened people in Douglas, 25 miles away.

Daily Express (front page), dated Saturday 30th November 1957, price 2 d(old pennies). Headline: "Riddle of the night sky" "what was it that stripped the paint off this trawler?" "The 'thing' blows up at sea, Express staff reporters." "The mystery of a huge flaming object, flashing at lightning speed across the night sky and vanishing in a mighty explosion was still unsolved last night. To those who saw the 'thing', in a Fleetwood trawler, it was was a frightening, wonderfull, never to be forgotten experience. Some people described it as 'carrot-shaped', others like a 'massive flying wing', but no-one could say what it was. The time was 02:35 AM. A fleetwood trawler, 'Ella Hewett' was sailing between the Isle of Man and Scotland, on her way to Iceland. The four men on watch saw a deep red glow, which lingered in the sky for three minutes, then as dawn came, Skipper Fred Sutton looked at the wheel house and bridge, which was white the night before. Not a speck of white paint was to be seen, only the red-lead undercoating. Skipper Sutton radioed the owners and said "A very funny thing has happened". He told them about the vanishing paint. Said a spokesman for the owners, the Hewett Fishing company last night, "The Skipper was naturally mystified and said 'I have been scratching my head about it, now you scratch yours!". As the Ella Hewett steamed off Oban, Skipper Sutton said over the radio telephone "It's no seaman's tale, I'm telling you about, laddie, it happened all right, even though I did not actually see it myself." Then 45 year-old Bosun, Hugh Smith, spoke about the cloud. "I have seen some strange things in my time at sea, but nothing like this. One moment it was dark, then the next, there was this eerie something all about us. There was no vibration, no explosion, in fact, no sensation at all. but it was something strange to see, I can tell you!". Two Coastguards, out of half a dozen people who saw the 'thing' on the Isle of Man told their stories last night, and one was asked by the headquarters of the British Coastguard service in London to send a full report. The time was 02:35 AM. 30 year-old Coastguard James Harvey, from Belfast, sent recently for duty to the Isle of Man was just going off- duty at Scarlet Point, 9 miles from Douglas, and within mile of the Ronaldsway airport. As he got on a cycle to go 1 miles to his home, he looked up. "I saw something travelling fast from West to East", he said. "It was larger and brighter than any star. It was blue, white, and" [go to page 2, column 4] "coming behind was a red-orange glow. The speed was terrific, I thought at first it was a Jet, but no Jet plane could travel at that speed. I would say 3 seconds later, there was a bang. Whatever it was went into the cloud, or rather, the mist above the sea. It's course was astonishlingly steady, and straight. It was miles up, and it certainly was not a flying star. I have seen those, and I have seen meteors too, this was nothing like them". Coastguard Harvey tried hard to describe the 'thing'. "It was snub- nosed and tapered off, just like a carrot" he said. "It was rather frightening". Coastguard Joseph Prophet, aged 42, just caught a glimpse of the flames, but heard the explosion. He said "It cut across the sky like sheet lightning, there was that yellowish glow, and then the flash lit up the whole area and the sea as well". On the promenade at Douglas, 10 miles away from the Coastguard station, Frank Quayle, 50 year old painter was making his way home to Meerhall private hotel when he saw it. He works at night, keeping fresh the pedestrian crossings and the white lines for traffic in the town. He was just 50 yards from his front door, facing Douglas bay, when he heard something. "I don't know what it was", he said, "and I don't know what it meant, but I have the feeling I had a grandstand view of the grand finale of something historic. I saw the 'thing' come in over the top of the town, going straight and fast seawards. A sheet of orange flame seemed to leave it. The front was bluish-white, I could just not think at all, then I lost it in the mist over Douglas bay. There was a real 'boom' of an explosion, the kind of explosion that I have never heard before. It was just like something breaking up and melting away, the sight was wonderfull". Three policemen on the beat in different parts of Douglas saw the flash and heard the explosion. Police headquarters last night said "we had nundreds of enquiries, but no official report, and we are making no official enquiries". Down in South Wales, people were still talking of the 'thing', like a massive flying wing which whisked along in the sky. Time-2:25 AM. Two policemen in different parts of the Rhonda valley looked into the cloudless night and saw the 'thing' shooting along straight and silent. They immediately reported a very bright blue object with a long bright tail travelling north-west. 2:28 AM-on the lonely Brecon Beacons, the driver of a 15-ton lorry saw the 'thing' through his windscreen. "A big red ball of fire, very low, silent, and travelling very fast", he told police over the telephone. "It was at least 3 times as big as my lorry". 2:35 AM-The crew of a police patrol car near Cowerbridge, Glamorgan, 20 miles away, said they saw the 'thing' only 100 feet from the ground. "It was illuminated, Delta-shaped, and bright greenish-blue in colour". Was it a Sputnik or it's rocket? Prof. Bernard Lovell, in charge of Manchester University's giant radio telescope at Jodrell Bank said last night "It is most unlikely. I think it was a large meteorite", but he added, " We are extremely uncertain about the position of rocket I. We cannot exclude the possibility that it has already come in". At that time, the first rocket and sattelite I were in the southern hemisphere, and sattelite II was 1,000 miles North of Jodrell Bank, and 700 miles up. Was it a British rocket being tested? The supply ministry rocket chiefs claimed that the 'thing' could not possibly have been one of their experimental rockets, or rocket-assisted aircraft. Was it a meteorite? A meteorlogical office spokesman said that there had been no reports of a meteorite. Was it a plane? The Air ministry said no aircraft was missing. Note to the mystery: Coastguards at Ramsay in the Isle of Man heard and saw nothing, yet the explosion wakened people in Douglas, 25 miles away.

Daily Express (front page), dated Saturday 30th November 1957, price 2 d(old pennies). Headline: "Riddle of the night sky" "what was it that stripped the paint off this trawler?" "The 'thing' blows up at sea, Express staff reporters." "The mystery of a huge flaming object, flashing at lightning speed across the night sky and vanishing in a mighty explosion was still unsolved last night. To those who saw the 'thing', in a Fleetwood trawler, it was was a frightening, wonderfull, never to be forgotten experience. Some people described it as 'carrot-shaped', others like a 'massive flying wing', but no-one could say what it was. The time was 02:35 AM. A fleetwood trawler, 'Ella Hewett' was sailing between the Isle of Man and Scotland, on her way to Iceland. The four men on watch saw a deep red glow, which lingered in the sky for three minutes, then as dawn came, Skipper Fred Sutton looked at the wheel house and bridge, which was white the night before. Not a speck of white paint was to be seen, only the red-lead undercoating. Skipper Sutton radioed the owners and said "A very funny thing has happened". He told them about the vanishing paint. Said a spokesman for the owners, the Hewett Fishing company last night, "The Skipper was naturally mystified and said 'I have been scratching my head about it, now you scratch yours!". As the Ella Hewett steamed off Oban, Skipper Sutton said over the radio telephone "It's no seaman's tale, I'm telling you about, laddie, it happened all right, even though I did not actually see it myself." Then 45 year-old Bosun, Hugh Smith, spoke about the cloud. "I have seen some strange things in my time at sea, but nothing like this. One moment it was dark, then the next, there was this eerie something all about us. There was no vibration, no explosion, in fact, no sensation at all. but it was something strange to see, I can tell you!". Two Coastguards, out of half a dozen people who saw the 'thing' on the Isle of Man told their stories last night, and one was asked by the headquarters of the British Coastguard service in London to send a full report. The time was 02:35 AM. 30 year-old Coastguard James Harvey, from Belfast, sent recently for duty to the Isle of Man was just going off- duty at Scarlet Point, 9 miles from Douglas, and within mile of the Ronaldsway airport. As he got on a cycle to go 1 miles to his home, he looked up. "I saw something travelling fast from West to East", he said. "It was larger and brighter than any star. It was blue, white, and" [go to page 2, column 4] "coming behind was a red-orange glow. The speed was terrific, I thought at first it was a Jet, but no Jet plane could travel at that speed. I would say 3 seconds later, there was a bang. Whatever it was went into the cloud, or rather, the mist above the sea. It's course was astonishlingly steady, and straight. It was miles up, and it certainly was not a flying star. I have seen those, and I have seen meteors too, this was nothing like them". Coastguard Harvey tried hard to describe the 'thing'. "It was snub- nosed and tapered off, just like a carrot" he said. "It was rather frightening". Coastguard Joseph Prophet, aged 42, just caught a glimpse of the flames, but heard the explosion. He said "It cut across the sky like sheet lightning, there was that yellowish glow, and then the flash lit up the whole area and the sea as well". On the promenade at Douglas, 10 miles away from the Coastguard station, Frank Quayle, 50 year old painter was making his way home to Meerhall private hotel when he saw it. He works at night, keeping fresh the pedestrian crossings and the white lines for traffic in the town. He was just 50 yards from his front door, facing Douglas bay, when he heard something. "I don't know what it was", he said, "and I don't know what it meant, but I have the feeling I had a grandstand view of the grand finale of something historic. I saw the 'thing' come in over the top of the town, going straight and fast seawards. A sheet of orange flame seemed to leave it. The front was bluish-white, I could just not think at all, then I lost it in the mist over Douglas bay. There was a real 'boom' of an explosion, the kind of explosion that I have never heard before. It was just like something breaking up and melting away, the sight was wonderfull". Three policemen on the beat in different parts of Douglas saw the flash and heard the explosion. Police headquarters last night said "we had nundreds of enquiries, but no official report, and we are making no official enquiries". Down in South Wales, people were still talking of the 'thing', like a massive flying wing which whisked along in the sky. Time-2:25 AM. Two policemen in different parts of the Rhonda valley looked into the cloudless night and saw the 'thing' shooting along straight and silent. They immediately reported a very bright blue object with a long bright tail travelling north-west. 2:28 AM-on the lonely Brecon Beacons, the driver of a 15-ton lorry saw the 'thing' through his windscreen. "A big red ball of fire, very low, silent, and travelling very fast", he told police over the telephone. "It was at least 3 times as big as my lorry". 2:35 AM-The crew of a police patrol car near Cowerbridge, Glamorgan, 20 miles away, said they saw the 'thing' only 100 feet from the ground. "It was illuminated, Delta-shaped, and bright greenish-blue in colour". Was it a Sputnik or it's rocket? Prof. Bernard Lovell, in charge of Manchester University's giant radio telescope at Jodrell Bank said last night "It is most unlikely. I think it was a large meteorite", but he added, " We are extremely uncertain about the position of rocket I. We cannot exclude the possibility that it has already come in". At that time, the first rocket and sattelite I were in the southern hemisphere, and sattelite II was 1,000 miles North of Jodrell Bank, and 700 miles up. Was it a British rocket being tested? The supply ministry rocket chiefs claimed that the 'thing' could not possibly have been one of their experimental rockets, or rocket-assisted aircraft. Was it a meteorite? A meteorlogical office spokesman said that there had been no reports of a meteorite. Was it a plane? The Air ministry said no aircraft was missing. Note to the mystery: Coastguards at Ramsay in the Isle of Man heard and saw nothing, yet the explosion wakened people in Douglas, 25 miles away.

 

Daily Express (front page), dated Saturday 30th November 1957, price 2 d(old pennies). Headline: "Riddle of the night sky" "what was it that stripped the paint off this trawler?" "The 'thing' blows up at sea, Express staff reporters." "The mystery of a huge flaming object, flashing at lightning speed across the night sky and vanishing in a mighty explosion was still unsolved last night. To those who saw the 'thing', in a Fleetwood trawler, it was was a frightening, wonderfull, never to be forgotten experience. Some people described it as 'carrot-shaped', others like a 'massive flying wing', but no-one could say what it was. The time was 02:35 AM. A fleetwood trawler, 'Ella Hewett' was sailing between the Isle of Man and Scotland, on her way to Iceland. The four men on watch saw a deep red glow, which lingered in the sky for three minutes, then as dawn came, Skipper Fred Sutton looked at the wheel house and bridge, which was white the night before. Not a speck of white paint was to be seen, only the red-lead undercoating. Skipper Sutton radioed the owners and said "A very funny thing has happened". He told them about the vanishing paint. Said a spokesman for the owners, the Hewett Fishing company last night, "The Skipper was naturally mystified and said 'I have been scratching my head about it, now you scratch yours!". As the Ella Hewett steamed off Oban, Skipper Sutton said over the radio telephone "It's no seaman's tale, I'm telling you about, laddie, it happened all right, even though I did not actually see it myself." Then 45 year-old Bosun, Hugh Smith, spoke about the cloud. "I have seen some strange things in my time at sea, but nothing like this. One moment it was dark, then the next, there was this eerie something all about us. There was no vibration, no explosion, in fact, no sensation at all. but it was something strange to see, I can tell you!". Two Coastguards, out of half a dozen people who saw the 'thing' on the Isle of Man told their stories last night, and one was asked by the headquarters of the British Coastguard service in London to send a full report. The time was 02:35 AM. 30 year-old Coastguard James Harvey, from Belfast, sent recently for duty to the Isle of Man was just going off- duty at Scarlet Point, 9 miles from Douglas, and within mile of the Ronaldsway airport. As he got on a cycle to go 1 miles to his home, he looked up. "I saw something travelling fast from West to East", he said. "It was larger and brighter than any star. It was blue, white, and" [go to page 2, column 4] "coming behind was a red-orange glow. The speed was terrific, I thought at first it was a Jet, but no Jet plane could travel at that speed. I would say 3 seconds later, there was a bang. Whatever it was went into the cloud, or rather, the mist above the sea. It's course was astonishlingly steady, and straight. It was miles up, and it certainly was not a flying star. I have seen those, and I have seen meteors too, this was nothing like them". Coastguard Harvey tried hard to describe the 'thing'. "It was snub- nosed and tapered off, just like a carrot" he said. "It was rather frightening". Coastguard Joseph Prophet, aged 42, just caught a glimpse of the flames, but heard the explosion. He said "It cut across the sky like sheet lightning, there was that yellowish glow, and then the flash lit up the whole area and the sea as well". On the promenade at Douglas, 10 miles away from the Coastguard station, Frank Quayle, 50 year old painter was making his way home to Meerhall private hotel when he saw it. He works at night, keeping fresh the pedestrian crossings and the white lines for traffic in the town. He was just 50 yards from his front door, facing Douglas bay, when he heard something. "I don't know what it was", he said, "and I don't know what it meant, but I have the feeling I had a grandstand view of the grand finale of something historic. I saw the 'thing' come in over the top of the town, going straight and fast seawards. A sheet of orange flame seemed to leave it. The front was bluish-white, I could just not think at all, then I lost it in the mist over Douglas bay. There was a real 'boom' of an explosion, the kind of explosion that I have never heard before. It was just like something breaking up and melting away, the sight was wonderfull". Three policemen on the beat in different parts of Douglas saw the flash and heard the explosion. Police headquarters last night said "we had nundreds of enquiries, but no official report, and we are making no official enquiries". Down in South Wales, people were still talking of the 'thing', like a massive flying wing which whisked along in the sky. Time-2:25 AM. Two policemen in different parts of the Rhonda valley looked into the cloudless night and saw the 'thing' shooting along straight and silent. They immediately reported a very bright blue object with a long bright tail travelling north-west. 2:28 AM-on the lonely Brecon Beacons, the driver of a 15-ton lorry saw the 'thing' through his windscreen. "A big red ball of fire, very low, silent, and travelling very fast", he told police over the telephone. "It was at least 3 times as big as my lorry". 2:35 AM-The crew of a police patrol car near Cowerbridge, Glamorgan, 20 miles away, said they saw the 'thing' only 100 feet from the ground. "It was illuminated, Delta-shaped, and bright greenish-blue in colour". Was it a Sputnik or it's rocket? Prof. Bernard Lovell, in charge of Manchester University's giant radio telescope at Jodrell Bank said last night "It is most unlikely. I think it was a large meteorite", but he added, " We are extremely uncertain about the position of rocket I. We cannot exclude the possibility that it has already come in". At that time, the first rocket and sattelite I were in the southern hemisphere, and sattelite II was 1,000 miles North of Jodrell Bank, and 700 miles up. Was it a British rocket being tested? The supply ministry rocket chiefs claimed that the 'thing' could not possibly have been one of their experimental rockets, or rocket-assisted aircraft. Was it a meteorite? A meteorlogical office spokesman said that there had been no reports of a meteorite. Was it a plane? The Air ministry said no aircraft was missing. Note to the mystery: Coastguards at Ramsay in the Isle of Man heard and saw nothing, yet the explosion wakened people in Douglas, 25 miles away.